Online GPA to letter grade conversion

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GPA to letter grade conversion

GPA to letter grade conversion calculator and conversion table.

GPA to letter grade conversion calculator

GPA:
 
Letter grade:

GPA to letter grade conversion table

How to convert GPA to letter grade.

GPA Letter
Grade
Percentage
Grade
4.33 A+ 97%-100%
4.00 A 93%-96%
3.67 A- 90%-92%
3.33 B+ 87%-89%
3.00 B 83%-86%
2.67 B- 80%-82%
2.33 C+ 77%-79%
2.00 C 73%-76%
1.67 C- 70%-72%
1.33 D+ 67%-69%
1.00 D 63%-66%
0.67 D- 60%-62%
0 F 0%-59%

Online Grade Calculators

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Grade Calculators

1. College GPA calculator

Grade point average (GPA) is a commonly used indicator of an individual's academic achievement in school. It is the average of the grades attained in each course, taking course credit into consideration. Grading systems vary in different countries, or even schools. This calculator accepts letter grades as well as numerical inputs. These letter grades are translated into numerical values as shown below.

A+ = 4.3 grade points

A = 4 grade points

A- = 3.7 grade points

B+ = 3.3 grade points

B = 3 grade points

B- = 2.7 grade points

C+ = 2.3 grade points

C = 2 grade points

C- = 1.7 grade points

D+ = 1.3 grade points

D = 1 grade point

D- = 0.7 grade points

F = 0 grade points

P (pass), NP (not pass), I (incomplete), W (withdrawal) will be ignored.

Most schools, colleges, and universities in the United States use a grading system based on the letters above, though E is sometimes used instead of F. Grading systems do differ however based on what constitutes an A or B, and some do not include grades such as an A+ or a B-. Others may attribute more weight to certain courses, and thus whatever grade is attained in the course will have a larger effect on overall GPA.

With College GPA Calculator you may access to one of the most important tools for students. As you probably know, GPA stands for Grade Point Average. That means it is the average result from all of your grades. As calculated by the Universities of the United States, it is certainly a quite complicated system. That is we came up with College GPA Calculator, a tool that will make such task easy for you!

What is GPA and how can we help you calculate it?

Your GPA will determine your future options when it comes to studying in the US. How does it really work?

There are two basic grade systems in the country: based on numbers and letters. Both represent the grades you receive on daily assignments and tests. Knowing those represent the first steps in calculating your GPA.

The number system is different than in other countries because the scale goes from zero to one hundred. Each numerical note corresponds to a letter note. Any note less than a C (70) is considered as a failure.

We can help you calculate your GPA by providing you with a tool that automatically makes the numbers for you. Introduce the relevant data, hit calculate and you are good to go!

How to calculate GPA

Follow the below steps to accurately calculate your GPA.

Step 1: Your college GPA is calculated by adding up all the grade points you have earned, and dividing by the total amount of credit hours earned.

Step 2: The chart below demonstrates how each letter grade corresponds to a certain grade point. The calculator above automatically converts each letter grade into grade points for your convenience.

Step 3: Credit hours vary from class to class. For example, a normal class at your high school may be worth 4 credits, while a part-time class is worth 2 credits. This means the part-time class will have less of an effect on your college GPA than the full-time class.

Step 4: Enter a letter grade for each class you want to include in your calculation, the classes corresponding number of credits.

Step 5: Submit the classes and credits to automatically generate your GPA.

2. Final Grade Calculator

Final grade is the rank that you get after your final exams. This online calculator is used to find the grade and marks needed to score on the last exam, so as to reach a certain grade. (i.e.,) If you are willing to reach A rank and currently you are in B rank, So to reach A rank you will need to score a certian mark. This calculator is used to find that certain score. Enter your current score, required score and the worth of the required grade from current into the calculator and find the final grade.

Final Grade Calculation

This calculator uses the formula:

F=G−((1−w)×C)/w

Where:

F = Final exam grade

G = Grade you want for the class

w = Weight of the final exam, divided by 100 (put weight in decimal form vs. percentage form)

C = Your current grade

Sample Final Exam Grade Calculation

My grade in Statistics class is 85%. I want to get at least an A- or 90% in the class for the term. What score do I need on the final exam if it is worth 40% of my grade?

Using the formula above, I want a 90 in the class and I currently have an 85. The final is worth 40% of the term grade.

First, convert the weight of the final exam from percent to decimal: 40 ÷ 100 = 0.40

F=90−((1−0.4)×85)/0.4

F=90−((0.6)×85)/0.4

F=90−51/0.4

F=39/0.4

F=97.5

So if I have an 85 in the class, I want a 90, and the final exam is worth 40%, I need a 97.5 to get a 90 in the class.

Brief history of different grading systems

In 1785, students at Yale were ranked based on "optimi" being the highest rank, followed by second optimi, inferiore (lower), and pejores (worse). At William and Mary, students were ranked as either No. 1, or No. 2, where No. 1 represented students that were first in their class, while No. 2 represented those who were "orderly, correct and attentive." Meanwhile at Harvard, students were graded based on a numerical system from 1-200 (except for math and philosophy where 1-100 was used). Later, shortly after 1883, Harvard used a system of "Classes" where students were either Class I, II, III, IV, or V, with V representing a failing grade. All of these examples show the subjective, arbitrary, and inconsistent nature with which different institutions graded their students, demonstrating the need for a more standardized, albeit equally arbitrary grading system.

In 1887, Mount Holyoke College became the first college to use letter grades similar to those commonly used today. The college used a grading scale with the letters A, B, C, D, and E, where E represented a failing grade. This grading system however, was far stricter than those commonly used today, with a failing grade being defined as anything below a 75%. The college later re-defined their grading system, adding the letter F for a failing grade (still below 75%). This system of using a letter grading scale became increasingly popular within colleges and high schools, eventually leading to the letter grading systems typically used today. However, there is still significant variation regarding what may constitute an A, or whether a system uses plusses or minuses (i.e. A+ or B-), among other differences.

An alternative to the letter grading system

Letter grades provide an easy means to generalize a student's performance. They can be more effective than qualitative evaluations in situations where "right" or "wrong" answers can be easily quantified, such as an algebra exam, but alone may not provide a student with enough feedback in regards to an assessment like a written paper (which is much more subjective).

Although a written analysis of each individual student's work may be a more effective form of feedback, there exists the argument that students and parents are unlikely to read the feedback, and that teachers do not have the time to write such an analysis. There is precedence for this type of evaluation system however, in Saint Ann's School in New York City, an arts-oriented private school that does not have a letter grading system. Instead, teachers write anecdotal reports for each student. This method of evaluation focuses on promoting learning and improvement, rather than the pursuit of a certain letter grade in a course. For better or for worse however, these types of programs constitute a minority in the United States, and though the experience may be better for the student, most institutions still use a fairly standard letter grading system that students will have to adjust to. The time investment that this type of evaluation method requires of teachers/professors is likely not viable on university campuses with hundreds of students per course. As such, although there are other high schools such as Sanborn High School that approach grading in a more qualitative way, it remains to be seen whether such grading methods can be scalable. Until then, more generalized forms of grading like the letter grading system are unlikely to be entirely replaced. However, many educators already try to create an environment that limits the role that grades play in motivating students. One could argue that a combination of these two systems would likely be the most realistic, and effective way to provide a more standardized evaluation of students, while promoting learning.


3. GPA Calculator

Use this GPA calculator to find your GPA using the standard 4.0 GPA scale or a weighted scale for Honors and AP courses. Input the course name, the number of course credits and your grade for the term. Select the grade scale:

Std = Standard scale where A = 4.0

Hon = Honors scale where A = 4.5

AP = Advanced Placement scale where A = 5.0

The calculator fills in the grade point value for the letter grade on the scale you selected. If you know your letter grade value and it's different from our scale you can edit the grade points field. For example if you got an A+ in an Honors course and you know your A+ is worth 4.8 points at your school you can update the Points field by typing in 4.8.

Click the Calculate button to calculate your GPA. For each course, we multiply the number of credits by the grade points value. Then add up these products and divide by the total number of credits. See a sample calculation in the table at the bottom of this page.

How to Calculate GPA

1. For each course, multiply credits by grade points

2. Add those results to get total quality points

3. Divide total quality points by total number of credits for courses where you earned a letter grade

4. Do not include credits for pass/no pass courses, incompletes or withdrawals (P, N/P, I, W)

Guidelines for raising GPA

There is no sure formula for raising a person's GPA, and strategies that work for one person may not work for another. However, there are some common guidelines and study habits that can be helpful when trying to raise GPA. The guidelines below are mostly anecdotal and are not intended as fail-safe ways to raise one's GPA, but are generally good habits that can have positive effects on learning, which may in turn increase GPA.

Actively attending classes:

Classes are being paid for likely either by a student or their parent, and not attending classes is both a financial loss, as well as a loss in potential education. While a student may decide that attending a particular class is not beneficial to their learning, or not a good use of their time, even if the professor is largely ineffective, there is usually valuable information that can be obtained simply by attending class. Not attending class for example, could result in negative effects on a student's GPA if for some reason the student misses information about a change in exam location or material.

Furthermore, while it may be true that professors largely repeat notes in class that are often later posted to a website, skipping classes can result in missed opportunities. Questions from students in class, as well as the explanations that may follow can provide seemingly inconsequential bits of information that can in fact make a large difference on tests. This is because interaction with the professor and other students can increase a person's depth of knowledge on a subject, or may provide the small tip necessary to solidify a student's understanding of a topic.

In addition, attending class, particularly if the class is smaller in size, can allow the professor to link a name, a face, and a grade, particularly if the student actively participates. Professors that see attentive and involved students are more inclined to be understanding of any potential issues that may arise such as emergencies resulting in missed due dates. Along with this, active participation is more likely to engage a student's mind in regards to the subject matter than reading online notes or a textbook, and points of confusion can also be clarified on the spot. These can in turn affect a person's grade and overall GPA.

Planning:

Every student has his or her own learning style. Some like to work for hours at a time to complete an assignment, while others may take many breaks. There is no ideal strategy, and how a person approaches learning is highly dependent on learning style, as well as adhering to a study strategy that complements their schedule and desires. The method that maximizes the value of the time spent is likely the most effective for improving learning, and subsequently, GPA.

Organization of work that needs to be done, as well as notes taken is also important. It is as important to be able to find relevant information as it is to take notes in class. Notes are most valuable when they can be used to supplement learning. Professors present large amounts of information during the course of a lecture, not all of which a student may have time to process. It is important to practice taking notes in a manner that enables the student to look back and learn (or look up) the information.

Time management is also an important aspect of planning. There are only 24 hours in a day, not all of which a person can use effectively. While learning is important, taking more courses or activities than a person can handle can be detrimental both to learning, as well as to average GPA. Once all courses have been selected, budgeting and scheduling time for each course can help to put the amount work and time necessary into perspective. While the amount of work necessary for a number of courses may initially seem daunting, planning how and when to approach the work for each course may help reduce stress and improve efficiency once the work is quantified (or could help a person realize that they are tackling more than they can handle).

Reviewing work regularly, in terms of studying, is another aspect of time management. A substantial amount of information is covered in a course by the time of the final exam, and reviewing some of the information regularly over a period of time is often more effective than attempting to memorize all of the information right before an exam. Learning the information through periodic review can ultimately save a person more time, and potentially position them to perform better on an exam, and thereby improve GPA.

4. GPA to letter grade Calculator

It is a free online GPA to letter grade conversion calculator. It converts GPA units to letter grade using a standard grading scale system in any school or college or university. Some of the institutes may use some other matrix but most of the institutes using the same grading scale. The GPA to letter conversion table along with the percentage matrix included in the table shown below.

Letter grading starts from A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D- and F. Each letter has its equivalent percentage value, GPA value. Grades are assigned by a standard grading system. Our cumulative grade calculator converts graduate schools GPA, high school GPA, and college GPA.

How to convert GPA to letter grade?

Our GPA grading system converts the weighted GPA to letter grade base on the standard grading scale system. Most of the high schools, colleges, and universities are using the same grading standards to calculate grading. Here we are going to give you a simplified solution to convert GPA to letter grade. Simply enter the GPA value and click on Calculate to get an appropriate letter grade.

How to use?

To use this you need to follow given instructions.

1. Open GPA to Letter Grade.

2. Enter the GPA and click on Calculate to get accurate results.


5. Grade Calculator

a It is beneficial to know how to calculate your current grade in a course in order to know what you need to achieve on your final exam to obtain your desired overall course grade. Below is an example of how to use the following grade calculator to determine your current course grade before the final exam.

To use this calculator, simply input your current percentage on an assignment, test or exam as well as the value it has towards your final grade. For each new assignment, test or exam, click on "Add New Assignment". Your results will be updated as you input assignments.

Brief history of different grading systems

In 1785, students at Yale were ranked based on "optimi" being the highest rank, followed by second optimi, inferiore (lower), and pejores (worse). At William and Mary, students were ranked as either No. 1, or No. 2, where No. 1 represented students that were first in their class, while No. 2 represented those who were "orderly, correct and attentive." Meanwhile at Harvard, students were graded based on a numerical system from 1-200 (except for math and philosophy where 1-100 was used). Later, shortly after 1883, Harvard used a system of "Classes" where students were either Class I, II, III, IV, or V, with V representing a failing grade. All of these examples show the subjective, arbitrary, and inconsistent nature with which different institutions graded their students, demonstrating the need for a more standardized, albeit equally arbitrary grading system.

In 1887, Mount Holyoke College became the first college to use letter grades similar to those commonly used today. The college used a grading scale with the letters A, B, C, D, and E, where E represented a failing grade. This grading system however, was far stricter than those commonly used today, with a failing grade being defined as anything below a 75%. The college later re-defined their grading system, adding the letter F for a failing grade (still below 75%). This system of using a letter grading scale became increasingly popular within colleges and high schools, eventually leading to the letter grading systems typically used today. However, there is still significant variation regarding what may constitute an A, or whether a system uses plusses or minuses (i.e. A+ or B-), among other differences.

An alternative to the letter grading system

Letter grades provide an easy means to generalize a student's performance. They can be more effective than qualitative evaluations in situations where "right" or "wrong" answers can be easily quantified, such as an algebra exam, but alone may not provide a student with enough feedback in regards to an assessment like a written paper (which is much more subjective).

Although a written analysis of each individual student's work may be a more effective form of feedback, there exists the argument that students and parents are unlikely to read the feedback, and that teachers do not have the time to write such an analysis. There is precedence for this type of evaluation system however, in Saint Ann's School in New York City, an arts-oriented private school that does not have a letter grading system. Instead, teachers write anecdotal reports for each student. This method of evaluation focuses on promoting learning and improvement, rather than the pursuit of a certain letter grade in a course. For better or for worse however, these types of programs constitute a minority in the United States, and though the experience may be better for the student, most institutions still use a fairly standard letter grading system that students will have to adjust to. The time investment that this type of evaluation method requires of teachers/professors is likely not viable on university campuses with hundreds of students per course. As such, although there are other high schools such as Sanborn High School that approach grading in a more qualitative way, it remains to be seen whether such grading methods can be scalable. Until then, more generalized forms of grading like the letter grading system are unlikely to be entirely replaced. However, many educators already try to create an environment that limits the role that grades play in motivating students. One could argue that a combination of these two systems would likely be the most realistic, and effective way to provide a more standardized evaluation of students, while promoting learning.

6. High School GPA Calculator

GPA stands for Grade Point Average. It's a score that measures your academic achievement, and is used throughout your educational career: in middle school, high school, and college. The basic formula for calculating GPA is to divide the total points earned in a program by the total number of courses. If your courses have credits, or if they are graded differently (e.g., honors courses), you need to compute the weighted average.

In high school education, some courses take class difficulty into account, so they're graded differently. When taking classes from a higher level, the extra points can be added to your grade, e.g.:

1 extra point for AP Courses (Advanced Placement Courses), IB Courses (International Baccalaureate Courses), and College Preparatory Classes.

0.5 additional points for Honors Courses (this rule may vary between schools, awarding e.g., 1 point for this type of course).

How to calculate High School GPA

Follow the below steps to accurately calculate your High School GPA.

Step 1: Your high school GPA is calculated by adding up all the grade points you have earned, and dividing by the total amount of credit hours earned.

Step 2: The chart below demonstrates how each letter grade corresponds to a certain grade point. The calculator above automatically converts each letter grade into grade points for your convenience.

Step 3: Credit hours vary from class to class. For example, a normal class at your high school may be worth 4 credits, while a part-time class is worth 2 credits. This means the part-time class will have less of an effect on your high school GPA than the full-time class.

Step 4: Enter a letter grade for each class you want to include in your calculation, the classes corresponding number of credits.

Step 5: Submit the classes and credits to automatically generate your GPA.